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5 self-help books for people who don’t like self-help books

5 self-help books for people who don’t like self-help books

Nowadays, it’s kind of unusual to ask for help. I mean, Google has everything anyway, right? If you get lost, you can just look for your position in Google Maps and navigate your way from there. Or if you’re craving for something, you can just look up a recipe online or order from different restaurants. But still, life’s bigger questions, such as “What the hell should I do with my life?” or “How do I motivate myself to do better?” really can’t be answered by a simple internet search (as much as we’d like it). Let’s face it–life, and adult-ing in particular, are both too hard, and sometimes, we just really need a helping hand.

We’ve listed some of our favorite self-help books that can perhaps help us kids get through life’s hurdles. I know self-help books can tend to be boring and a little bit on the annoying side, but don’t worry, these aren’t the cringe-y titles written by self-righteous pricks who only make you feel bad about yourself.

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck is the kind of self-help book that won’t treat your mistakes and failures like wake-up calls for self-improvement. Instead, it stresses the fact that failures are failures, and we have to be okay with that. Mark Manson instills in his readers that positive thinking only leads to a miserable life, and we have to instead seek for the things that we really care about, and focus on them.

F*ck Feelings: One Shrink’s Practical Advice for Managing All Life’s Impossible Problems by Miachael I. Bennett and Sarah Bennett

Written by a father-and daughter tandem (a psychologist and a comedy writer), this book will make you exchange your unattainable quest for perfection for realistic ways of self-improvement. The book will help you swallow the hard truth that you can never be perfect, and make you realize that you’re right where you’re supposed to be in the moment.

You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life by Jen Sincero

How-to’s are usually boring lists of preachy stuff that people who seem to have figured out their own lives make, but this book is definitely not one of those. Jen Sincero entertains with her witty and funny guides on self-improvement. By the end of the book, you’re guaranteed to be thoroughly motivated all while wearing a determined smile on your face.

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do In Life and Business by Charles Duhigg

New York Times business reporter Charles Duhigg wrote a book that tackles the scientific bases of habits–why they exist, and how having the right ones can actually turn our lives around. He talks about a lot science-y stuff in a not-so-technical way which is easy to understand, with narratives about companies like Procter & Gamble and Alcoa. We may not know it, but these businesses’ successes can relate to our day-to-day habits.

Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell

In this book, Malcolm Gladwell writes about the importance on focusing on your own success, rather than actively comparing yourself to others. He writes stories of people’s lives–how their successes are determined not only by their own perseverance but also by the environment that they are in.

By Bea Amador

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