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4 shows to help you understand the #HijaAko movement

Trigger warning: Mentions of sexual abuse, graphic themes

Growing up, society taught me that sexual abuse happens for three reasons: the clothes we wear, our deafening silence and late-night hours. I’ve experienced and heard enough to know this isn’t true. Believe it or not, every woman you’ve met has a sexual assault story; from catcalling to graphic sexual abuse.  

Someone is raped every hour in the Philippines. And yet, we barely talk or educate ourselves on why sexual assault happens. Hell, folks like Ben Tulfo say shit like: “Sexy ladies, careful with the way you dress up! You are inviting the beast.” There are people out there who believe it’s the victim’s fault—never rapists themselves. 

Apart from reading up on rape culture and listening to survivor stories, here are some helpful TV shows for visual learners. These can help you unlearn victim-blaming and realize how fucked up rape culture truly is. 

“I May Destroy You”

 

Arabella is a young, Twitter-famous author who just wants to do her own thing and finish writing her overdue book. During a night of procrastination, everything turns for the worse when she gets drugged and taken advantage of. From LGBTQ+ themes to its careful portrayal of surviving sexual assault, “I May Destroy You” is a game-changer.  It’s a complicated comedy-drama about every woman’s unspoken nightmare. 

“Unbelievable”

Based on a true story, this show is about a teenager accused of “lying” about her rape case. With two female detectives handling her case, they follow a piece of evidence that could lead them to the truth. It takes them to a twisted path in order to uncover everything.

“Sex Education” 

This Netflix series centers around Otis Miller’s underground sex advice ring on his campus. But if we learned anything from season two, the show is really less about Otis and more about his peers. The show doesn’t shy away from topics like sexual assault, slut-shaming and rape culture. They even dedicated a whole episode about how teens deal with sexual assault and the support system they form for one another.

“The End of the Fucking World”

It’s our generation’s take on “Bonnie and Clyde.” Apart from this show being a road adventure, its plot also focuses on how sexual violence stays with survivors for a long, long time. Both seasons focus on surviving assaults like these. Although the show is hyperviolent, it still portrays how brutality can push people to the edge.

Read more:
Someone is raped every hour in the Philippines—it’s disturbing
‘The Half of It’ is the unique, queer coming-of-age romcom you’re waiting for
10 slice-of-life animes to watch when you need a will to live

Still from “Sex Education”

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Rogin Losa
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