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5 non-fashion insights from UP Clothing Tech graduation fashion show “Hulma”

The 2020 UP Clothing Tech graduation fashion show was a layered exhibit that explored style, culture, and social issues. Aptly titled “Hulma,” the runway was graced by looks molded by the experiences and core beliefs of graduating design students who, in turn, will attempt to mold society through their art. And so we list the ways the fashion show proved to be more than just about fashion.

Aptly titled “Hulma,” the runway was graced by looks molded by the experiences and core beliefs of graduating design students.

1. Going hard by going home

Local culture was present in many of the designs that graced the runway. More than butterfly sleeves, suave ternos and cloth weaved from white bark fibre, the outfits that were inspired by their designers’ Filipino roots had strong messages embellished,  literally, on their sleeves.

UP Hulma featuring the work of guest designer Antonina Amoncio

From guest designer Antonina Amoncio

Outfits that were inspired by their designers’ Filipino roots had strong messages embellished,  literally, on their sleeves.

UP Hulma featuring the work of graduate designer Janinna Santos

From “Pagsibol” by Janinna Santos

2. Art is both a weapon and a shield

Art exists to protest the ails of real life and fashion is no exception. Aside from strong statements rooted in social commentary, there were also pieces that became a space for candid authenticity. Bright hues, large shapes, and personalized aesthetics danced along the runway.

UP Hulma featuring the work of graduate designer Katcy Cabrera

From “Bad as Boys” by Katcy Cabrera

Art exists to protest the ails of real life and fashion is no exception.

UP Hulma featuring the work of graduate designer Katcy Cabrera

From “Bad as Boys” by Katcy Cabrera

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3. Creativity is uncomfortable

As it should be. These young, passionate designers from UP remind us that art, by nature, does not push boundaries for the sake of being  out-of-the-box. Art only pushes boundaries because it often tackles heavily filtered topics like social relevance and unapologetic self-expression.

UP Hulma featuring the work of graduate designer Kaye Luna

From “Lulu and Nana” by Kaye Luna

Art, by nature, does not push boundaries for the sake of being out-of-the-box.

UP Hulma featuring the work of graduate designer Rafa de Guzman

From “Ihada” by Rafa de Guzman

4. Self-expression can be expressed through activism

Clothing is a canvas and style is its visual language. Aside from expressing themselves through personal taste, statements were made this evening through strong social commentary sewn on display.

UP Hulma featuring the work of graduate designer Joanna David

From “Maria Justicia” by Joanna David

Clothing is a canvas and style is its visual language.

UP Hulma featuring the work of graduate designer Joanna David

From “Maria Justicia” by Joanna David

5. Bawal bastos

Misogyny is alive and wellif the audio track of the “Dalagang Pilipina” line is any indication. Layered on top of the viral  track is a collection of misogynistic comments made by public figures and regular countrymen alike. Perhaps one of the most memorable lessons for the night: Di kami bebe mo.

UP Hulma featuring the work of graduate designer Veronica Perote

From “Dalagang Pilipina, Yeah” by Veronica Perote

Read more: These Filipino-designed Vans are mythology-inspired

Photos of “Maria Justicia,” “Ihada,” “Bad as Boys,” “Lulu and Nana,” and the work of guest designer Antonina Amoncio taken by Bob Sison

Photo of “Dalagang Pilipina, Yeah” taken by Tony Cancio

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